The Skeleton Lake

In Uttarakhand, at Trishul
The corpses are strewn about and beneath the ice in the “lake of skeletons,” which was found in 1942 by a patrolling British forest warden.
The lake, which remains frozen for the most of the year, grows and contracts depending on the season and weather. The bones are only visible after the snow melts, sometimes with flesh attached and beautifully preserved. So far, the skeletal remains of 600-800 persons have been discovered here. The local administration refers to it as a “mysterious lake” in tourism advertisements.
For nearly a half-century, anthropologists and scientists have analysed the bones and puzzled over a slew of issues.
Who were these individuals? When did they pass away? How did they perish? How did they get there?
Another theory is that some of the bones are those of Indian soldiers who attempted to enter Tibet in 1841 but were repulsed. More than 70 of them were subsequently forced to make their way home across the Himalayas, where they perished.
Another speculates that this might have been a “cemetery” where pandemic victims were buried. A traditional folk ballad in the area tells how Goddess Nanda Devi caused a hail storm “as hard as iron” that murdered those weaving their way through the lake. Nanda Devi, India’s second-highest peak, is venerated as a deity.
Previous bone investigations revealed that the majority of the persons who died were tall – “above normal height.” The majority of them were middle-aged adults between the ages of 35 and 40. There were no infants or children present. Some of them were senior citizens. They were all in fantastic health.
Furthermore, it was widely considered that the bones belonged to a single group of individuals who died all at once at a single terrible event in the 9th century.
The most recent five-year study, which included 28 co-authors from 16 universities in India, the United States, and Germany, discovered that all of these assumptions may not be correct.
Scientists genetically analysed and carbon-dated the bones of 38 individuals discovered in the lake, including 15 women, some of which date back over 1,200 years.
The scientists have discovered that the deaths were separated by 1000 years, and they genetical samples were also differs.
“It calls into question any interpretations that involved a single tragic episode that led to their deaths,” said Eadaoin Harney, the study’s lead author and a doctoral student at Harvard University.
More intriguingly, the genomes investigation showed that the deceased belonged to a diverse population: one group was genetically similar to those living in South Asia today, while the other was “closely related” to people living in modern Europe, particularly those on the Greek island of Crete.
Furthermore, the South Asians that arrived “do not appear to come from the same community.”
“Some of them have ancestors who are more frequent in communities in the subcontinent’s north, while others have ancestors who are more common in individuals in the south,” Ms Harney continues.
So, did these several groups of people arrive at the lake in smaller groups over the course of a few hundred years? Did some of them perish in a single incident?
There were no weaponry, weapons, or trade goods discovered at the site since the lake is not on a trading route. Genetic research revealed no indication of the presence of any ancient bacterial infection that may explain sickness as the cause of fatalities.
A pilgrimage that goes near the lake might explain why people were in the region. Credible reports of pilgrimage in the area do not occur until the late 19th century, according to studies, while inscriptions in nearby temples date between the 8th and 10th centuries, “suggesting possibly older beginnings.”
So, did these several groups of people arrive at the lake in smaller groups over the course of a few hundred years? Did some of them perish in a single incident?
There were no weaponry, weapons, or trade goods discovered at the site since the lake is not on a trading route. Genetic research revealed no indication of the presence of any ancient bacterial infection that may explain sickness as the cause of fatalities.
A pilgrimage that goes near the lake might explain why people were in the region. Credible reports of pilgrimage in the area do not occur until the late 19th century, according to studies, while inscriptions in nearby temples date between the 8th and 10th centuries, “suggesting possibly older beginnings.”

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